gauge

[geyj]

verb (used with object), gauged, gaug·ing.

noun


Nearby words

  1. gaudí i cornet,
  2. gaudí i cornet, antonio,
  3. gauffer,
  4. gauffering,
  5. gaugamela,
  6. gauge boson,
  7. gauge theory,
  8. gauger,
  9. gauguin,
  10. gauguin, paul

Also especially in technical use, gage.

Origin of gauge

1375–1425; late Middle English < Old North French (French jauge) < Germanic

Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for gauges


British Dictionary definitions for gauges

gauge

gage

verb (tr)

to measure or determine the amount, quantity, size, condition, etc, of
to estimate or appraise; judge
to check for conformity or bring into conformity with a standard measurement, dimension, etc

noun

a standard measurement, dimension, capacity, or quantity
any of various instruments for measuring a quantitya pressure gauge
any of various devices used to check for conformity with a standard measurement
a standard or means for assessing; test; criterion
scope, capacity, or extent
the diameter of the barrel of a gun, esp a shotgun
the thickness of sheet metal or the diameter of wire
the distance between the rails of a railway track: in Britain 4 ft 8 1/2 in. (1.435 m)
the distance between two wheels on the same axle of a vehicle, truck, etc
nautical the position of a vessel in relation to the wind and another vessel. One vessel may be windward (weather gauge) or leeward (lee gauge) of the other
the proportion of plaster of Paris added to mortar to accelerate its setting
the distance between the nails securing the slates, tiles, etc, of a roof
a measure of the fineness of woven or knitted fabric, usually expressed as the number of needles used per inch
the width of motion-picture film or magnetic tape

adjective

(of a pressure measurement) measured on a pressure gauge that registers zero at atmospheric pressure; above or below atmospheric pressure5 bar gauge See also absolute (def. 10)
Derived Formsgaugeable or gageable, adjectivegaugeably or gageably, adverb

Word Origin for gauge

C15: from Old Northern French, probably of Germanic origin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gauges
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper