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liver

1
[ liv-er ]
/ ˈlɪv ər /
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See synonyms for: liver / livers on Thesaurus.com

noun

adjective

of the color of liver.

verb (used without object)

(of paint, ink, etc.) to undergo irreversible thickening.

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Origin of liver

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English liver(e), liverre, Old English lifer(e), cognate with Dutch lever, German Leber, Old Norse lifr; further origin uncertain; perhaps akin to Greek liparós “fat, gleaming, fruitful”

OTHER WORDS FROM liver

liv·er·less, adjective

Definition for liver (2 of 3)

liver2
[ liv-er ]
/ ˈlɪv ər /

noun

a person who lives in a manner specified: an extravagant liver.
a dweller or resident; inhabitant.

Origin of liver

2
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English; see origin at live1, -er1

Definition for liver (3 of 3)

liver3
[ lahy-ver ]
/ ˈlaɪ vər /

adjective

comparative of live2.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for liver

British Dictionary definitions for liver (1 of 2)

liver1
/ (ˈlɪvə) /

noun

a multilobed highly vascular reddish-brown glandular organ occupying most of the upper right part of the human abdominal cavity immediately below the diaphragm. It secretes bile, stores glycogen, detoxifies certain poisons, and plays an important part in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fat, helping to maintain a correct balance of nutrientsRelated adjective: hepatic
the corresponding organ in animals
the liver of certain animals used as food
a reddish-brown colour, sometimes with a greyish tinge

Derived forms of liver

liverless, adjective

Word Origin for liver

Old English lifer; related to Old High German lebrav, Old Norse lefr, Greek liparos fat

British Dictionary definitions for liver (2 of 2)

liver2
/ (ˈlɪvə) /

noun

a person who lives in a specified waya fast liver
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for liver

liver
[ lĭvər ]

n.

The largest gland of the body, lying beneath the diaphragm in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity, which secretes bile and is active in the formation of certain blood proteins and in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Scientific definitions for liver

liver
[ lĭvər ]

A large glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrate animals that is essential to many metabolic processes. The liver secretes bile, stores fat and sugar as reserve energy sources, converts harmful substances to less toxic forms, and regulates the amount of blood in the body.
A similar organ of invertebrate animals.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cultural definitions for liver

liver

A large organ, located on the right side of the abdomen and protected by the lower rib cage, that produces bile and blood proteins, stores vitamins for later release into the bloodstream, removes toxins (including alcohol) from the blood, breaks down old red blood cells, and helps maintain levels of blood sugar in the body.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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