lunch

[luhnch]
See more synonyms for lunch on Thesaurus.com
verb (used without object)
  1. to eat lunch: We lunched quite late today.
verb (used with object)
  1. to provide lunch for: They lunched us in regal fashion.
Idioms
  1. out to lunch, Slang. not paying attention or tending to business; negligent: You must have been out to lunch when you wrote that weird report.

Origin of lunch

First recorded in 1585–95; short for luncheon
Related formslunch·er, nounlunch·less, adjectivepre·lunch, adjective, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for lunching

Contemporary Examples of lunching

  • I was lunching with an old friend at one of our favorite farm-to-table molecular gastronomy food trucks in Larchmont proper.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Aubrey Plaza’s Great Disconnect

    Aubrey Plaza

    August 15, 2014

  • Diplomacy traditionally has been the art of lunching with the right people at the right time.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Inside the Other Situation Room

    Daniel Stone

    May 19, 2011

  • After lunching on a caprese salad sandwich, Lynch lit up an American Spirit cigarette and sat down to talk about his paintings.

    The Daily Beast logo
    David Lynch's Twisted Art

    Peter Owen Nelson

    September 16, 2009

Historical Examples of lunching


British Dictionary definitions for lunching

lunch

noun
  1. a meal eaten during the middle of the day
  2. Caribbean (among older people) mid-afternoon tea
verb
  1. (intr) to eat lunch
  2. (tr) to provide or buy lunch for
Derived Formsluncher, noun

Word Origin for lunch

C16: probably short form of luncheon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for lunching

lunch

n.

"mid-day repast," 1786, shortened form of luncheon (q.v.). The verb meaning "to take to lunch" (said to be from the noun) also is attested from 1786:

PRATTLE. I always to be ſure, makes a point to keep up the dignity of the family I lives in. Wou'd you take a more ſolid refreſhment?--Have you lunch'd, Mr. Bribe?

BRIBE. Lunch'd O dear! Permit me, my dear Mrs. Prattle, to refreſh my sponge, upon the honey dew that clings to your raviſhing pouters. O! Mrs. Prattle, this ſhall be my lunch. (kiſſes)

["The Mode," in William Davies' "Plays Written for a Private Theatre," London, 1786]

But as late as 1817 the only definition of lunch in Webster's is "a large piece of food." OED says in 1820s the word "was regarded either as a vulgarism, or as a fashionable affectation." Related: Lunched; lunching. Lunch money is attested from 1868; lunch-time (n.) is from 1821; lunch hour is from 1840. Slang phrase out to lunch "insane, stupid, clueless" first recorded 1955, on notion of being "not there." Old English had nonmete "afternoon meal," literally "noon-meat."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with lunching

lunch

see eat someone alive (someone's lunch); free lunch; lose one's lunch; out to (lunch).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.