lurch

1
[lurch]
See more synonyms for lurch on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. an act or instance of swaying abruptly.
  2. a sudden tip or roll to one side, as of a ship or a staggering person.
  3. an awkward, swaying or staggering motion or gait.
verb (used without object)
  1. (of a ship) to roll or pitch suddenly.
  2. to make a lurch; move with lurches; stagger: The wounded man lurched across the room.

Origin of lurch

1
First recorded in 1760–70; origin uncertain
Related formslurch·ing·ly, adverb

Synonyms for lurch

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lurch

3
[lurch]
verb (used with object)
  1. Archaic. to do out of; defraud; cheat.
  2. Obsolete. to acquire through underhanded means; steal; filch.
verb (used without object)
  1. British Dialect. to lurk near a place; prowl.
noun
  1. Archaic. the act of lurking or state of watchfulness.

Origin of lurch

3
1375–1425; late Middle English lorchen, apparently variant of lurken to lurk
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for lurched

Contemporary Examples of lurched

  • He lurched hard over the curb, his hand raised toward the passing cars.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Amazing Superheroes of New York City

    Matthew Shaer

    August 7, 2011

  • He lurched from story to story and sometimes into improvisation with no reason for or momentum to his overall line of thought.

  • Chasen did not surrender her purse, jewelry, money, or car, but lurched leftward onto Whittier, where she crashed into a lamppost.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Chasen Murderer's Secret Past

    A. L. Bardach

    December 15, 2010

  • Theo fell off his bike and lurched across the road, then collapsed.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Life On The Run

    Ayaan Hirsi Ali

    October 6, 2008

Historical Examples of lurched

  • It was as though the involuntary kiss had lurched him forward into a futurity of misery.

    Thoroughbreds

    W. A. Fraser

  • Behind them lurched another man, slinking in the background.

    Louisiana Lou

    William West Winter

  • Lionel lurched in, closed the door, and shot home one of its bolts.

    The Sea-Hawk

    Raphael Sabatini

  • He turned, and lurched into the dining-room upon legs that trembled.

    The Sea-Hawk

    Raphael Sabatini

  • He rose somewhat unsteadily, and lurched across to the window.


British Dictionary definitions for lurched

lurch

1
verb (intr)
  1. to lean or pitch suddenly to one side
  2. to stagger or sway
noun
  1. the act or an instance of lurching
Derived Formslurching, adjective

Word Origin for lurch

C19: origin unknown

lurch

2
noun
  1. leave someone in the lurch to desert someone in trouble
  2. cribbage the state of a losing player with less than 30 points at the end of a game (esp in the phrase in the lurch)

Word Origin for lurch

C16: from French lourche a game similar to backgammon, apparently from lourche (adj) deceived, probably of Germanic origin

lurch

3
verb
  1. (intr) archaic, or dialect to prowl or steal about suspiciously

Word Origin for lurch

C15: perhaps a variant of lurk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for lurched

lurch

n.1

"sudden pitch to one side," 1784, from earlier lee-larches (1765), a nautical term for "the sudden roll which a ship makes to lee-ward in a high sea, when a large wave strikes her, and bears her weather-side violently up, which depresses the other in proportion" ["Complete Dictionary of Arts and Sciences," London 1765]; perhaps from French lacher "to let go," from Latin laxus (see lax).

When a Ship is brought by the Lee, it is commonly occaſsioned by a large Sea, and by the Neglect of the Helm's-man. When the Wind is two or three Points on the Quarter, the Ship taking a Lurch, brings the Wind on the other Side, and lays the Sails all dead to the Maſt; as the Yards are braced up, ſhe then having no Way, and the Helm being of no Service, I would therefore brace about the Head ſails ſharp the other Way .... [John Hamilton Moore, Practical Navigator, 8th ed., 1784]

lurch

n.2

"predicament," 1580s, from Middle English lurch (v.) "to beat in a game of skill (often by a great many points)," mid-14c., probably literally "to make a complete victory in lorche," a game akin to backgammon, from Old French lourche. The game name is perhaps related to Middle English lurken, lorken "to lie hidden, lie in ambush," or it may be adopted into French from Middle High German lurz "left," also "wrong."

lurch

v.

1821, from lurch (n.1). Related: Lurched; lurching.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with lurched

lurch

see leave in the lurch.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.