Origin of plop

First recorded in 1815–25; imitative
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for plopping

Contemporary Examples of plopping

  • He sat down, smiled, and surprised the group by plopping two packs of Winston Reds on the table and lighting a cigarette.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Syria’s Islamist Rebels

    Mike Giglio

    August 2, 2012

Historical Examples of plopping

  • This is boiling and plopping (I coin this word) like mush in huge pots, or thick soap in mighty caldrons.

    A Summer's Outing

    Carter H. Harrison

  • The old crone puffed up again at this unexpected flare, and went out of the room, plopping her feet on floor and mumbling.

    Birthright

    T.S. Stribling

  • Quite a good lot of bullets were plopping into the water, so the Commodore ordered the Colne to lie further out.


British Dictionary definitions for plopping

plop

noun

the characteristic sound made by an object dropping into water without a splash

verb plops, plopping or plopped

to fall or cause to fall with the sound of a plopthe stone plopped into the water

interjection

an exclamation imitative of this soundto go plop

Word Origin for plop

C19: imitative of the sound
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for plopping

plop

v.

1821, imitative of the sound of a smooth object dropping into water. Related: Plopped; plopping. Thackary (mid-19c.) used plap (v.). As a noun from 1833.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper