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poke

1
[ pohk ]
/ poʊk /
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See synonyms for: poke / poking on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), poked, pok·ing.
verb (used without object), poked, pok·ing.
noun
a thrust or push.
Informal. a slow or dawdling person; slowpoke.
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Idioms about poke

    poke fun at, to ridicule or mock, especially covertly or slyly: In her novel, she pokes fun at her ex-husband.
    poke one's nose into, Informal. to meddle in; pry into: We felt as if half the people in town were poking their noses into our lives.

Origin of poke

1
First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English, from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German poken “to thrust, stick with a knife”; see also poach2

OTHER WORDS FROM poke

pok·a·ble, adjective

Other definitions for poke (2 of 5)

poke2
[ pohk ]
/ poʊk /

noun
Chiefly Midland U.S. and Scot.. a bag or sack, especially a small one.
a wallet or purse.
Archaic. a pocket.

Origin of poke

2
First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English, from Middle Dutch, whence also Old North French poque, French poche “bag, pocket”; cf. poach1, pocket, pouch

Other definitions for poke (3 of 5)

poke3
[ pohk ]
/ poʊk /

noun
a projecting brim at the front of a bonnet, framing the face.
Also called poke bonnet. a bonnet or hat with such a brim.

Origin of poke

3
First recorded in 1760–70; apparently special use of poke1

Other definitions for poke (4 of 5)

poke4
[ pohk ]
/ poʊk /

noun

Origin of poke

4
First recorded in 1590–1600; perhaps shortening of obsolete pocan “pokeweed,” perhaps variant of puccoon (pokeberries and puccoon roots were both sources of red dye)

Other definitions for poke (5 of 5)

poke5
[ poh-key ]
/ poʊˈkeɪ /

noun
a Hawaiian salad of cubed raw tuna mixed with diced sweet onion and scallion and marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil.

Origin of poke

5
First recorded in 1975–80; from Hawaian: literally, “to slice crosswise, section, a section”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use poke in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for poke (1 of 4)

poke1
/ (pəʊk) /

verb
noun

Word Origin for poke

C14: from Low German and Middle Dutch poken to thrust, prod, strike

British Dictionary definitions for poke (2 of 4)

poke2
/ (pəʊk) /

noun
dialect a pocket or bag
a pig in a poke See pig (def. 9)

Word Origin for poke

C13: from Old Northern French poque, of Germanic origin; related to Old English pocca bag, Old Norse poki pouch, Middle Dutch poke bag; compare poach ²

British Dictionary definitions for poke (3 of 4)

poke3
/ (pəʊk) /

noun
Also called: poke bonnet a woman's bonnet with a brim that projects at the front, popular in the 18th and 19th centuries
the brim itself

Word Origin for poke

C18: from poke 1 (in the sense: to thrust out, project)

British Dictionary definitions for poke (4 of 4)

poke4
/ (pəʊk) /

noun
short for pokeweed
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with poke

poke

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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