Idioms

    the powers that be, those in supreme command; the authorities: The decision is in the hands of the powers that be.

Origin of power

1250–1300; Middle English pouer(e), poer(e) < Anglo-French poueir, poer, noun use of infinitive: to be able < Vulgar Latin *potēre (replacing Latin posse to be able, have power). See potent1

Related forms

coun·ter·pow·er, nounde-pow·er, verb (used with object)re·pow·er, verb

Synonym study

3. See strength.

Definition for power (2 of 2)

pow

1
[ pou ]
/ paʊ /

interjection

(used to express or indicate a heavy blow or a loud, explosive noise.)

noun

a heavy blow or a loud, explosive noise.
the power of exciting.

adjective

exciting and appealing.

Origin of pow

1
An Americanism dating back to 1880–85
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for power

British Dictionary definitions for power (1 of 5)

power

/ (ˈpaʊə) /

noun

verb (tr)

Word Origin for power

C13: from Anglo-Norman poer, from Vulgar Latin potēre (unattested), from Latin posse to be able

British Dictionary definitions for power (2 of 5)

pow

1
/ (paʊ) /

interjection

an exclamation imitative of a collision, explosion, etc

British Dictionary definitions for power (3 of 5)

pow

2
/ (paʊ) /

noun

Scot the head or a head of hair

Word Origin for pow

a Scot variant of poll

British Dictionary definitions for power (4 of 5)

pow

3
/ (paʊ) /

noun

Scot a creek or slow stream

Word Origin for pow

C15: from earlier Scots poll

British Dictionary definitions for power (5 of 5)

POW


abbreviation for

prisoner of war
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for power

power

[ pouər ]

n.

The capacity to perform or act effectively.
Strength or force that is exerted or that is capable of being exerted.
The amount of work done per unit time.
A measure of the magnification of an optical instrument, such as a microscope or telescope.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for power

power

[ pouər ]

The source of energy used to operate a machine or other system.
The rate at which work is done, or energy expended, per unit time. Power is usually measured in watts (especially for electrical power) or horsepower (especially for mechanical power). For a path conducting electrical current, such as a component in an electric circuit, P = VI, where P is the power dissipated along the path, V is the voltage across the path, and I is the current through the path. Compare energy work.
Mathematics The number of times a number or expression is multiplied by itself, as shown by an exponent. Thus ten to the sixth power, or 106, equals one million.
A number that represents the magnification of an optical instrument, such as a microscope or telescope. A 500-power microscope can magnify an image to 500 times its original size.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for power

power


In physics, the amount of energy put out or produced in a given amount of time. Power is often measured in watts or kilowatts.

In mathematics, a power is a number multiplied by itself the number of times signified by an exponent placed to the right and above it. Thus, 32, which means 3 × 3, is a power — the second power of three, or three squared, or nine. The expression 106, or ten to the sixth power, means 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 × 10 × 10, or one million.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with power

power


In addition to the idioms beginning with power

  • power behind the throne
  • powers that be, the

also see:

  • corridors of power
  • more power to someone
  • staying power
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.