seizing

[ see-zing ]
/ ˈsi zɪŋ /

noun

the act of a person or thing that seizes.
Nautical. a means of binding or fastening together two objects, as two ropes, or parts of the same rope, by a number of longitudinal and transverse turns of marline, wire, or other small stuff.

Origin of seizing

Middle English word dating back to 1300–50; see origin at seize, -ing1

Definition for seizing (2 of 2)

seize

[ seez ]
/ siz /

verb (used with object), seized, seiz·ing.

verb (used without object), seized, seiz·ing.

Origin of seize

1250–1300; Middle English saisen, seisen < Old French saisir < Medieval Latin sacīre to place (in phrase sacīre ad propriētam to take as one's own, lay claim to) < Frankish, perhaps akin to Gothic satjan to set, put, place
Related forms

Synonym study

7. See catch.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for seizing

British Dictionary definitions for seizing (1 of 2)

seizing

/ (ˈsiːzɪŋ) /

noun

nautical a binding used for holding together two ropes, two spars, etc, esp by lashing with a separate rope

British Dictionary definitions for seizing (2 of 2)

seize

/ (siːz) /

verb (mainly tr)

Derived Formsseizable, adjective

Word Origin for seize

C13 saisen, from Old French saisir, from Medieval Latin sacīre to position, of Germanic origin; related to Gothic satjan to set 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for seizing

seize


v.

mid-13c., from Old French seisir "to take possession of, take by force; put in possession of, bestow upon" (Modern French saisir), from Late Latin sacire, which is generally held to be from a Germanic source, but the exact origin is uncertain. Perhaps from Frankish *sakjan "lay claim to" (cf. Gothic sokjan, Old English secan "to seek;" see seek). Or perhaps from Proto-Germanic *satjan "to place" (see set (v.)).

Originally a legal term in reference to feudal property holdings or offices. Meaning "to grip with the hands or teeth" is from c.1300; that of "to take possession by force or capture" (of a city, etc.) is from mid-14c. Figurative use, with reference to death, disease, fear, etc. is from late 14c. Meaning "to grasp with the mind" is attested from 1855. Of engines or other mechanisms, attested from 1878. Related: Seized; seizing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper