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stoked

[ stohkt ]
/ stoʊkt /
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adjective Slang.

exhilarated; excited.
intoxicated or stupefied with a drug; high.

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Origin of stoked

OTHER WORDS FROM stoked

un·stoked, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

VOCAB BUILDER

What does stoked mean?

Stoked is a slang adjective that describes someone as being very excited, as in I just heard that my favorite director is making a new movie and I’m already stoked.

Less commonly, stoked describes someone being intoxicated or stupefied by drugs.

Describing excitement, stoked is often followed by a word like about, to, or that to explain what a person is excited about, as in I’m pretty stoked about the huge graduation party tonight.

Stoked can also describe someone as being impaired by drugs, such as by being intoxicated or in a euphoric state, as in We had to take Josh home because he was too stoked to even remember where he lived.

Because both of these senses are slang, they generally aren’t used in formal writing. You’re more likely to see them on social media or hear them when talking with your friends.

Example: I’m stoked to go to the concert because my favorite band is the headliner.

Where does stoked come from?

The first records of the slang sense of stoked come from around 1963. It is the past tense of the verb stoke. The first records of stoke come from around 1675. It comes from the Dutch stoken, meaning “to feed or stock a fire.”

The slang stoked is believed to have come from Californian surfer slang during the 1950s or 1960s. Similarly to the slang gnarly, stoked has since spread from surfer lingo to mainstream use across the United States.

Interestingly, the excited sense of stoked has been used in Australia and New Zealand, but the intoxicated sense has not.

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What are some other forms related to stoked?

  • unstoked (adjective)

What are some synonyms for stoked?

What are some words that share a root or word element with stoked

What are some words that often get used in discussing stoked?

How is stoked used in real life?

Stoked is a common slang used when someone is excited about something.

Try using stoked!

Is stoked used correctly in the following sentence?

My little sister loves animals and is really stoked to go to the zoo with me tomorrow.

Example sentences from the Web for stoked

British Dictionary definitions for stoked

stoked
/ (stəʊkt) /

adjective

NZ informal very pleased; elatedreally stoked to have got the job
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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