tarn

[tahrn]
See more synonyms for tarn on Thesaurus.com

Origin of tarn

1300–50; Middle English terne < Old Norse tjǫrn pond, pool

Tarn

[tarn]
noun
  1. a department in S France. 2232 sq. mi. (5780 sq. km). Capital: Albi.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for tarn

Historical Examples of tarn

  • St. nimie is not once mentioned, and nothing is said about the gorges of the Tarn.

    The Roof of France

    Matilda Betham-Edwards

  • The Causse Noir from the Tarn is a sight not soon forgotten.

    The Roof of France

    Matilda Betham-Edwards

  • One evening in August, a warm, still evening, I happened to visit the tarn.

    Angling Sketches

    Andrew Lang

  • They are as safe in their tarn as those enchanted fish of the “Arabian Nights.”

    Angling Sketches

    Andrew Lang

  • They walked quietly on till the tarn was left some way behind.

    Feats on the Fiord

    Harriet Martineau


British Dictionary definitions for tarn

tarn

noun
  1. a small mountain lake or pool

Word Origin for tarn

C14: of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse tjörn pool

Tarn

noun
  1. a department of S France, in Midi-Pyrénées region. Capital: Albi. Pop: 350 477 (2003 est). Area: 5780 sq km (2254 sq miles)
  2. a river in SW France, rising in the Massif Central and flowing generally west to the Garonne River. Length: 375 km (233 miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tarn
n.

mid-13c., from Old Norse tjorn "small mountain lake without tributaries," from Proto-Germanic *terno, perhaps originally "water hole." A dialectal word popularized by the Lake poets.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

tarn in Science

tarn

[tärn]
  1. A small mountain lake, especially one formed as a glacier melts, filling a cirque with water.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.