tomb

[toom]
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noun
  1. an excavation in earth or rock for the burial of a corpse; grave.
  2. a mausoleum, burial chamber, or the like.
  3. a monument for housing or commemorating a dead person.
  4. any sepulchral structure.
verb (used with object)
  1. to place in or as if in a tomb; entomb; bury.

Origin of tomb

1225–75; Middle English tumbe < Anglo-French; Old French tombe < Late Latin tumba < Greek týmbos burial mound; akin to Latin tumēre to swell. See tumor, tumulus
Related formstomb·al, adjectivetomb·less, adjectivetomb·like, adjectiveun·tombed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


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British Dictionary definitions for tomb

tomb

noun
  1. a place, esp a vault beneath the ground, for the burial of a corpse
  2. a stone or other monument to the dead
  3. the tomb a poetic term for death
  4. anything serving as a burial placethe sea was his tomb
verb
  1. (tr) rare to place in a tomb; entomb
Derived Formstomblike, adjective

Word Origin for tomb

C13: from Old French tombe, from Late Latin tumba burial mound, from Greek tumbos; related to Latin tumēre to swell, Middle Irish tomm hill
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tomb
n.

late 13c., from Anglo-French tumbe, Old French tombe (12c.), from Late Latin tumba (cf. Italian tomba, French tombe, Spanish tumba), from Greek tymbos "burial mound, grave, tomb," from PIE root *teu- "to swell" (see thigh). The final -b began to be silent 14c. (cf. lamb, dumb). The Tombs, slang for "New York City prison" is recorded from 1840.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper