torment

[ verb tawr-ment, tawr-ment; noun tawr-ment ]
/ verb tɔrˈmɛnt, ˈtɔr mɛnt; noun ˈtɔr mɛnt /

verb (used with object)

noun

Origin of torment

1250–1300; (noun) Middle English < Old French < Latin tormentum rope, catapult, torture < *torkw-ment- (see torque, -ment); (v.) Middle English tormenten < Old French tormenter, derivative of torment (compare Late Latin tormentāre)

SYNONYMS FOR torment

1 harry, hector, vex, distress, agonize. T orment , rack , torture suggest causing great physical or mental pain, suffering, or harassment. T o torment is to afflict or harass as by incessant repetition of vexations or annoyances: to be tormented by doubts. T o rack is to affect with such pain as that suffered by one stretched on a rack; to concentrate with painful effort: to rack one's brains. T o torture is to afflict with acute and more or less protracted suffering: to torture one by keeping one in suspense.
2 plague, pester, tease, provoke, needle, trouble, fret.
4 torture, distress, anguish.

Related forms

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for torment

British Dictionary definitions for torment

torment


verb (tɔːˈmɛnt) (tr)

to afflict with great pain, suffering, or anguish; torture
to tease or pester in an annoying waystop tormenting the dog

noun (ˈtɔːmɛnt)

physical or mental pain
a source of pain, worry, annoyance, etc
archaic an instrument of torture
archaic the infliction of torture

Derived Forms

tormented, adjectivetormentedly, adverbtormenting, adjective, nountormentingly, adverb

Word Origin for torment

C13: from Old French, from Latin tormentum, from torquēre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012