tucker

1
[ tuhk-er ]
/ ˈtʌk ər /

noun

a person or thing that tucks.
a piece of linen, muslin, or the like, worn by women about the neck and shoulders.
a sewing machine attachment for making tucks.
Australian. food.

Origin of tucker

1
First recorded in 1225–75, tucker is from the Middle English word tokere. See tuck1, -er1

Definition for tucker (2 of 3)

tucker

2
[ tuhk-er ]
/ ˈtʌk ər /

verb (used with object) Informal.

to weary; tire; exhaust (often followed by out): The game tuckered him out.

Origin of tucker

2
An Americanism dating back to 1825–35; tuck1 + -er6

Definition for tucker (3 of 3)

Tucker

[ tuhk-er ]
/ ˈtʌk ər /

noun

Richard,1915–75, U.S. operatic tenor.
SophieSophie Abruza, 1884–1966, U.S. singer and entertainer, born in Russia.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for tucker

British Dictionary definitions for tucker (1 of 2)

tucker

1
/ (ˈtʌkə) /

noun

a person or thing that tucks
a detachable yoke of lace, linen, etc, often white, worn over the breast, as of a low-cut dress
an attachment on a sewing machine used for making tucks at regular intervals
Australian and NZ old-fashioned an informal word for food

British Dictionary definitions for tucker (2 of 2)

tucker

2
/ (ˈtʌkə) /

verb

(tr; often passive usually foll by out) informal, mainly US and Canadian to weary or tire completely
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with tucker

tucker


see best bib and tucker.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.