twinkle

[twing-kuh l]

verb (used without object), twin·kled, twin·kling.

verb (used with object), twin·kled, twin·kling.

to emit (light) in intermittent gleams or flashes.
Archaic. to wink (the eyes or eyelids).

noun


Origin of twinkle

before 900; Middle English twinklen (v.), Old English twinclian; see twink, -le
Related formstwin·kler, nounun·twin·kled, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for twinkle

Historical Examples of twinkle

  • "Still, it was good of you to warn us," Twinkle added, sweetly.

    Policeman Bluejay

    L. Frank Baum

  • Twinkle was amazed, but could find no words to contradict this astonishing idea.

    Policeman Bluejay

    L. Frank Baum

  • Twinkle and Chubbins followed, one sitting in front of their guide and one behind him.

    Policeman Bluejay

    L. Frank Baum

  • With these words he darted toward the tree, and Twinkle and Chubbins followed.

    Policeman Bluejay

    L. Frank Baum

  • "I'm naughty sometimes, and so is Chubbins," said Twinkle, honestly.

    Policeman Bluejay

    L. Frank Baum


British Dictionary definitions for twinkle

twinkle

verb (mainly intr)

to emit or reflect light in a flickering manner; shine brightly and intermittently; sparkletwinkling stars
(of the eyes) to sparkle, esp with amusement or delight
rare to move about quickly
(also tr) rare to wink (the eyes); blink

noun

an intermittent gleam of light; flickering brightness; sparkle or glimmer
an instant
a rare word for wink 1
Derived Formstwinkler, nountwinkly, adjective

Word Origin for twinkle

Old English twinclian; related to Middle High German zwinken to blink
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for twinkle
v.

Old English twinclian, frequentative of twincan "to wink, blink;" related to Middle High German zwinken, German zwinkern, and probably somehow imitative. The noun is recorded from 1540s. Related: Twinkled; twinkling. Phrase in the twinkling of an eye is attested from c.1300.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper