valve

[ valv ]
/ vælv /

noun

verb (used with object), valved, valv·ing.

to provide with a means of controlling the flow of liquid, gas, etc., by inserting a valve.

Origin of valve

1350–1400; Middle English < Latin valvae leaves of a door

Related forms

valve·less, adjectivevalve·like, adjectiveun·der·valve, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for valve

British Dictionary definitions for valve

valve

/ (vælv) /

noun

Derived Forms

valveless, adjectivevalvelike, adjective

Word Origin for valve

C14: from Latin valva a folding door
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for valve

valve

[ vălv ]

n.

A membranous structure in a hollow organ or passage, as in an artery or vein, that folds or closes to prevent the return flow of the body fluid passing through it.
Any of various devices that regulate the flow of gases, liquids, or loose materials through piping or through apertures by opening, closing, or obstructing ports or passageways.
The movable control element of such a device.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for valve

valve

[ vălv ]

  1. Any of various mechanical devices that control the flow of liquids, gases, or loose material through pipes or channels by blocking and uncovering openings.
  2. The movable part or element of such a device.
Any of various structures that prevent the backward flow of a body fluid, such as blood or lymph. Valves in the heart, veins, and lymphatic vessels contain flaps (known as cusps) that close in response to pressure created by the backflow of fluid.
One of the paired hinged shells of certain mollusks, such as clams and oysters.
See electron tube.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.