Word of the Day

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

ikigai

[ ee-kee-gahy ]

noun

one’s reason for being, which in principle is the convergence of one’s personal passions, beliefs, values, and vocation: those who follow the concept of ikigai undertake the activities of their life with willingness and a satisfying sense of meaning.

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What is the origin of ikigai?

Ikigai, a Japanese word meaning “one’s personal reason for living,” is not easy to define in two minutes. Ikigai is a compound of iki “life, living, being alive” (from the verb ikiru “to live”) and the combining form –gai, from kai “worth, value, benefit.” In Japan in the 1960s, ikigai was for the betterment of society; in the 21st century, however, ikigai seems to focus on the development of oneself for the future, or self-actualization. Ikigai entered English in the early 1970s.

how is ikigai used?

Ikigai resides in the realm of small things. The morning air, the cup of coffee, the ray of sunshine, the massaging of octopus meat and the American president’s praise are on equal footing.

Ken Mogi, Awakening Your Ikigai, 2018

As such, ikigai emphasises process and immersion rather than a final aim.

Iza Kavedžija, "The Japanese concept of ikigai: why purpose might be a better goal than happiness," The Conversation, December 14, 2017

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Tuesday, August 25, 2020

aroint

[ uh-roint ]

verb (imperative)

Obsolete.

begone: Aroint thee, varlet!

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What is the origin of aroint?

The obsolete imperative verb or exclamation aroint! or aroint thee! means “begone!” Aroint has no convincing or even plausible etymology. The phrase Aroint thee, witch! first appears in Shakespeare’s King Lear and Macbeth. Aroint thee, witch! next appears in the works of the Scottish author and antiquarian Sir Walter Scott in 1816.

how is aroint used?

Aroynt thee, Witch, the rumpe-fed Ronyon cryes.

William Shakespeare, Macbeth, 1623

“Well, my power has not reached its height, but I am still strong enough to deal with you. Aroint ye!” She pointed the ivory cain at Mrs. Zimmerman. Nothing happened.

John Bellairs, The House With a Clock In Its Walls, 1973

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Monday, August 24, 2020

juberous

[ joo-ber-uhs ]

adjective

uncertain and reluctant; dubious; undecided: I was feeling mighty juberous about crossing that bridge.

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What is the origin of juberous?

The adjective juberous “uncertain, hesitant, reluctant” is supposedly a regionalism of the American Midwest—Indiana, in particular. Juberous is most likely a humorous alteration of dubious. It first occurs in The Hoosier School-Master (1871) by the American author and Methodist clergyman Edward Eggleston.

how is juberous used?

Tell you the truth, I been juberous about that loan proposition ever since Thad put his name to it.

Wendell Berry, "Pray Without Ceasing," The Southern Review, Autumn 1992

I’m kind of juberous about letting you go at it; but maybe, if your sister looked after you, you could do a good job.

Raymond Knister, White Narcissus, 1929

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