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hawk

1
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /
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noun

verb (used without object)

to fly, or hunt on the wing, like a hawk.
to hunt with hawks.

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Origin of hawk

1
First recorded before 900; Middle English hauk(e), Old English hafoc; cognate with Old Frisian havek, Old Saxon habuc, Old High German habuh, Old Norse haukr “hawk”

OTHER WORDS FROM hawk

hawk·like, adjective

Definition for hawk (2 of 5)

hawk2
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

verb (used with object)

to peddle or offer for sale by calling aloud in public.
to advertise or offer for sale: to hawk soap on television.
to spread (rumors, news, etc.).

verb (used without object)

to carry wares about for sale; peddle.

Origin of hawk

2
First recorded in 1470–80; back formation from hawker2

Definition for hawk (3 of 5)

hawk3
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

verb (used without object)

to make an effort to raise phlegm from the throat; clear the throat noisily.

verb (used with object)

to raise by noisily clearing the throat: to hawk phlegm up.

noun

a noisy effort to clear the throat.

Origin of hawk

3
First recorded in 1575–85; imitative

Definition for hawk (4 of 5)

hawk4
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

noun

a small, square board with a handle underneath it, used by plasterers and masons to hold plaster or mortar being applied.

Origin of hawk

4
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English; perhaps variant of hache “battle-ax” (see hatchet)

Definition for hawk (5 of 5)

Hawk
[ hawk ]
/ hɔk /

noun Military.

a medium-range, mobile U.S. surface-to-air missile system.

Origin of Hawk

H(oming)A(ll the)W(ay)K(iller)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for hawk

British Dictionary definitions for hawk (1 of 4)

hawk1
/ (hɔːk) /

noun

verb

Derived forms of hawk

hawklike, adjective

Word Origin for hawk

from Shakespeare (Hamlet II:2:375); handsaw is probably a corruption of dialect heronshaw heron Old English hafoc; related to Old Norse haukr, Old Frisian havek, Old High German habuh, Polish kobuz

British Dictionary definitions for hawk (2 of 4)

hawk2
/ (hɔːk) /

verb

to offer (goods) for sale, as in the street
(tr often foll by about) to spread (news, gossip, etc)

Word Origin for hawk

C16: back formation from hawker 1

British Dictionary definitions for hawk (3 of 4)

hawk3
/ (hɔːk) /

verb

(intr) to clear the throat noisily
(tr) to force (phlegm) up from the throat
British a slang word for spit 1

noun

a noisy clearing of the throat

Word Origin for hawk

C16: of imitative origin; see haw ²

British Dictionary definitions for hawk (4 of 4)

hawk4
/ (hɔːk) /

noun

a small square board with a handle underneath, used for carrying wet plaster or mortarAlso called: mortar board

Word Origin for hawk

of unknown origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with hawk

hawk

see watch like a hawk.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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